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Look Upstairs Recap

Last week I attended the 3 day conference, Look Upstairs. I am so thankful that I got the opportunity to go this year, thanks to the Collie Print Trust Scholarship, especially since it is the last 3 day forum for the foreseeable future. 

I knew I would have a great time, but I honestly was not expecting to learn so much from the speakers and to be so pumped up and inspired by such a varied and diverse group of speakers. Every continent was represented, and there were 22 nationalities within the speakers.

I wanted to do a mini recap on each speaker, but instead I’ve chosen to post up my favourite 8 speakers, and what I got out of each one.

I’ve listed them in order from most impacting to me, but they were all wonderful and I’m so glad I was able to hear a little bit from each of them!


Alejandro
Magallanes



The thing that really impacted me about Alejandro’s work was the things that influenced him, and that was his life and his family. It really opened my eyes to the obsession I have with this ‘design bubble,’ and that living life and drawing inspiration from relationships brings a raw and authentic quality to the work. He also drew me two illustrations, whilst I tried to speak to him in broken Spanish. I also purchased his book ‘Siempre Te Amare,’ meaning ‘I will always love you.’ Aw.


Ken 
Carbone



Ken separated his talk into four sections: Fame: Doing work for recognition; Fortune: doing work that helps pay the bills; Fun: Enjoying creativity in all areas of life;  and Freedom: being free creatively. He went through the history of the design studio Carbone, and the projects that put his studio on the map, which were beautiful. What I loved about his talk was that his love for creativity was expressed through all facets of his life, and he sketched as well as played music every day.


Philippe
Apeloig



Philippe Apeloig is one a name that goes down in history in the world of graphic design. What I enjoyed the most out of his talk was the ‘lo-fi’ nature of his work, considering he was doing design work before the information age. The way he creates light and shade, and has fun with typography whilst carefully considering grids and structure was amazing, and definitely made me reconsider my process and use of technology to aid my design projects.


Kongjian
Yu



Kongjian Yu’s talk was titled: 'The little foot revolution.' He spoke about natural beauty being taken over by the concept of urbanism and how in order to develop our cities, we don’t need to mould nature into something to make it beautiful. We can work with the earths natural qualities in order for it to naturally heal itself. The results of his work were stunning, and he shared areas where after 6 months, fish had returned and crops had begun to grow. It was inspiring and truly shows the power of design thinking.


John
Bielenberg



John’s work focussed on design thinking to better a community by using collaborative approaches. His advice included: be bold - start with the dent in the universe you want to make, get out - invite serendipity letting people and places inspire you, think wrong - break synaptic links that result in the same answers, make stuff - turn your ideas into something that can be shared, bet small - learn what works, what doesn’t, and improve, and move fast - prioritize your actions to accelerate positive change.


Agnello
Dias



Agnello’s work as a writer working in the world of advertising was amazing. He really displayed how seeing his culture through a new lense allowed him to write pieces that inspired a nation to get up and create change. By being sensitive to culture, whilst embracing forward thinking, he helped empowered his country to take a stand. Watch the moving ‘I am Mumbai,’ advertisment he wrote here. Advertising for good, who would have thunk it. 


Kelo
Kubu



Kelo heavily focussed her presentation on her work for the Mandela Poster Project Collective, discussing her role as curator on the project, helping to gather a group of people to make her dream a reality, and raising funds for a childrens hospital in South Africa. The one quote I remember vividly from her was:
"The saying goes: how do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time. But I think you need a group of different animals to really eat an elephant." She discussed collaboration as being vital to creating something bigger than you.  


Sandra
Hill



Sandra’s artwork moved me to tears and took the audience through her journey as a halfcast woman taken from her family as a child. Her story was heart wrenching, and made me understand her connection to art, and the need for her to express such pain and confusion with identity through various mediums. Her talk helped me to understand how deeply meaningful an art piece can be and that culture considerations need to be taken before creating artworks, especially within indigenous art.


My other favourites included Paolo Tassinari for beautiful art direction, Studio Roosegaarde for innovative public art, Dick Frizzell for seeing design differently, Bjorn Kussofsky for simple branding systems, Ken-Tsai Lee for self promotion, Jonathan Zawada for ‘solving unimportant problems’, Cordula Alessandri for fun loving brands, Greg More for intricate data design, Andre Baldinger for typography and grid systems, Saed Meshki for culture defining calligraphy, Super Critical Mass for new sound experiences and Paul Boudens for only doing things he wants to do.


Paolo 
Tassinari



Studio
Roosegaarde



Dick
Frizzell



Bjorn
Kussofsky



Ken-Tsai
Lee



Jonathan
Zawada



Cordula
Alessandri



Greg
More



Andre 
Baldinger



Saed
Meshki



Super Critical
Mass



Paul
Boudens



I was truly heartbroken when I heard this was the last 3 day design forum. I hope Australia’s design community takes a stand next year to bring such a thing to others in future as the experience has been invaluable to me. A big thank you to the AGIdeas team, Ken Cato and the Collie Print Trust for making my participation at Look Upstairs possible.









Look Upstairs Recap

Last week I attended the 3 day conference, Look Upstairs. I am so thankful that I got the opportunity to go this year, thanks to the Collie Print Trust Scholarship, especially since it is the last 3 day forum for the foreseeable future. 

I knew I would have a great time, but I honestly was not expecting to learn so much from the speakers and to be so pumped up and inspired by such a varied and diverse group of speakers. Every continent was represented, and there were 22 nationalities within the speakers.

I wanted to do a mini recap on each speaker, but instead I’ve chosen to post up my favourite 8 speakers, and what I got out of each one.

I’ve listed them in order from most impacting to me, but they were all wonderful and I’m so glad I was able to hear a little bit from each of them!


Alejandro
Magallanes



The thing that really impacted me about Alejandro’s work was the things that influenced him, and that was his life and his family. It really opened my eyes to the obsession I have with this ‘design bubble,’ and that living life and drawing inspiration from relationships brings a raw and authentic quality to the work. He also drew me two illustrations, whilst I tried to speak to him in broken Spanish. I also purchased his book ‘Siempre Te Amare,’ meaning ‘I will always love you.’ Aw.


Ken 
Carbone



Ken focused separated his talk into four sections: Fame: Doing work for recognition; Fortune: doing work that helps pay the bills; Fun: Enjoying creativity in all areas of life;  and Freedom: being free creatively. He went through the history of the design studio Carbone, and the projects that put his studio on the map, which were beautiful. What I loved about his talk was that his love for creativity was expressed through all facets of his life, and he sketched as well as played music every day.


Philippe
Apeloig



Philippe Apeloig is one a name that goes down in history in the world of graphic design. What I enjoyed the most out of his talk was the ‘lo-fi’ nature of his work, considering he was doing design work before the information age. The way he creates light and shade, and has fun with typography whilst carefully considering grids and structure was amazing, and definitely made me reconsider my process and use of technology to aid my design projects.


Kongjian
Yu



Kongjian Yu’s talk was titled: ‘The little foot revolution.’ He spoke about natural beauty being taken over by the concept of urbanism and how in order to develop our cities, we don’t need to mould nature into something to make it beautiful. We can work with the earths natural qualities in order for it to naturally heal itself. The results of his work were stunning, and he shared areas where after 6 months, fish had returned and crops had begun to grow. It was inspiring and truly shows the power of design thinking.


John
Bielenberg



John’s work focussed on design thinking to better a community by using collaborative approaches. His advice included: be bold - start with the dent in the universe you want to make, get out - invite serendipity letting people and places inspire you, think wrong - break synaptic links that result in the same answers, make stuff - turn your ideas into something that can be shared, bet small - learn what works, what doesn’t, and improve, and move fast - prioritize your actions to accelerate positive change.


Agnello
Dias



Agnello’s work as a writer working in the world of advertising was amazing. He really displayed how seeing his culture through a new lense allowed him to write pieces that inspired a nation to get up and create change. By being sensitive to culture, whilst embracing forward thinking, he helped empowered his country to take a stand. Watch the moving ‘I am Mumbai,’ advertisment he wrote here. Advertising for good, who would have thunk it. 


Kelo
Kubu



Kelo heavily focussed her presentation on her work for the Mandela Poster Project Collective, discussing her role as curator on the project, helping to gather a group of people to make her dream a reality, and raising funds for a childrens hospital in South Africa. The one quote I remember vividly from her was:
"The saying goes: how do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time. But I think you need a group of different animals to really eat an elephant." She discussed collaboration as being vital to creating something bigger than you.  


Sandra
Hill



Sandra’s artwork moved me to tears and took the audience through her journey as a halfcast woman taken from her family as a child. Her story was heart wrenching, and made me understand her connection to art, and the need for her to express such pain and confusion with identity through various mediums. Her talk helped me to understand how deeply meaningful an art piece can be and that culture considerations need to be taken before creating artworks, especially within indigenous art.


My other favourites included Paolo Tassinari for beautiful art direction, Studio Roosegaarde for innovative public art, Dick Frizzell for seeing design differently, Bjorn Kussofsky for simple branding systems, Ken-Tsai Lee for self promotion, Jonathan Zawada for ‘solving unimportant problems’, Cordula Alessandri for fun loving brands, Greg More for intricate data design, Andre Baldinger for typography and grid systems, Saed Meshki for culture defining calligraphy, Super Critical Mass for new sound experiences and Paul Boudens for only doing things he wants to do.


Paolo 
Tassinari



Studio
Roosegaarde



Dick
Frizzell



Bjorn
Kussofsky



Ken-Tsai
Lee



Jonathan
Zawada



Cordula
Alessandri



Greg
More



Andre 
Baldinger



Saed
Meshki



Super Critical
Mass



Paul
Boudens



I was truly heartbroken when I heard this was the last 3 day design forum. I hope Australia’s design community takes a stand next year to bring such a thing to others in future as the experience has been invaluable to me. A big thank you to the AGIdeas team, Ken Cato and the Collie Print Trust for making my participation at Look Upstairs possible.









justifiedmag:

Come join us at 25for25 with 2xElliott this friday 25for25.eventbrite.com
visualgraphc:

Flora
Melanie Medina